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Belongingness and Student Life

By: Jim Fox

“How do these kids find belonging and community in the somewhat chaotic environment that is high school?”

This is the question I found myself asking last June as I sat behind the lectern in room 103, interacting with the Juniors and Seniors in Mrs. Grafmiller’s Psychology course.

For the past 4 years I’ve been lucky enough to every now and again fill-in as a substitute teacher at Shoreline Christian. Last June my career in the substitutionary arts reached a new high when I became a long-term sub and was able to actually “teach” Psychology for a few weeks. Down in room 103 I started wondering how these very different kids from very different families and very different churches were able to find a sense of belonging as they navigated from classroom to classroom.      Read more >> about Belongingness and Student Life

Together

By: Joe Filbrun
 

I was born into a family that belonged to a community I like to refer to as “almost Amish.” While our community didn’t reject all modern technology, as most truly Amish communities do, there were strict limits. We had electricity, appliances, power tools, and cars, but radios and televisions were seen as destructive to the community and, so, were not allowed. Having roots in the “radical reformation” of the 16th and 17th centuries in southern Germany, this was a community that was forged in persecution, including martyrdom, at the hands of both the Protestants and Roman Catholics. For all of its flaws, neuroses, and failures, this was a community that understood the importance of taking care of each other, and found deep joy in the simplicity of hard work, shared meals, and the harmonization of human voices. Whenever there was a need, the community came together. Read more >> about Together

Passing the Baton: A Message from Tim Visser

Relay races are some of the most exciting events in track. The race is pretty simple with four individuals working together to get their baton around the track as fast as possible. The challenge is that the baton needs to be passed three times, these exchanges can only take place within a 20 meter zone, and the key is to never let the baton slow down during the exchange. Teams can enter the zone in first place and come out in last place because a runner started too early or too late or dropped the baton in the chaos that can exist within an exchange zone. An individual can run a great leg of a relay, but it will all go to pieces if they do not properly manage the baton exchange with their teammate.

On Monday night, I informed the School Board that I would like to hand my leadership baton to the next person and to finish my time as school administrator at the end of this school year.

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